Time to go in-depth

bimcast by Catenda is a podcast series on open BIM and the possibilities of digitizing the construction industry. We will invite knowledgeable and inspiring guests to talk about topics related to open BIM, digitization and open international standards in the world of construction and infrastructure. This series is part of our ongoing efforts to make the construction industry worldwide ready for the work processes and digital flow of the future.

Most of the episodes will be in English, but if they on occasion are in Norwegian, an English version of the content will be available on our website.

Episode 1 - BIM in Local Government
(Episode 1 is in Norwegian) Gjest i denne episoden er Jürgen Spindler. Han er forvaltningsleder og seniorrådgiver for BIM-forvaltning, drift, vedlikehold og utvikling i Ullensaker kommune. Jürgen er en ildsjel som får til mye av lite, han er nettverksorientert og løfter alltid fram andre underveis. Dette har gjort ham til en av de aller fremste innenfor digitaliseringsprosesser i kommune-Norge. I podcasten snakker han om sin digitaliseringsreise så langt, og deler også sine beste tips og gir konkrete innspill til hvordan andre digitaliseringsentusiaster der ute kan komme i gang.
Episode 1 is in Norwegian.
Read the English translation here.
Ep 1 in English
SOME TEXT HERE
Who does this well
TOP TIPS TO GET STARTED
Jürgen Spindlers´s tips for enthusiasts in local government
1) Make sure you have good helpers, and that you have competent people around you.
2) Keep it simple. A complex language and many acronyms prevents understanding and communication.
3) Plan with all parties involved: politicians, direct users, bureaucrats and inhabitants.
4) Visualise the possibilities, think lifecycle span when planning. Construction costs are only 10%.
5) Learn from others, ask around. Standardise the demands for digital requirements to all suppliers.
Episode 2 - France vs Norway on the construction site
Is a construction site the same thing in Norway and France when it comes to digital tools and BIM? How does the approach to digital processes in the construction phase in these two countries differ from one another? What can we learn from each other in terms of best practice? Are there fundamental differences that exist because of law, regulations and culture? How do France and Norway fit into the global picture? We have invited two people with deep construction experience, Julien Benoit from French Legendre and Rupert Hanna from Norwegian Byggtjeneste (earlier at SKANSKA) to share their thoughts and compare experiences.
Episode 2 is in English.
Read the transcription here.
Ep 2 in English
Suggested reading

Are you looking to understand more about France vs Norway on the construction site? Here is a collection of resources that make for a good starting point.

SOME TEXT HERE
Who does this well
TOP TIPS TO GET STARTED
BIM construction site tips 
1) Get involved. This is part of a learning process. Start using the available tools. Start demanding models on projects.
2) Companies and people who are not active part of the digitisation will be out of the game. Stay in, stay active.
3) Think models. Stop thinking drawings. Start making models of your trade, whatever you do.
4) Share information. Collaboration is key in digitization. Don’t take no for an answer, get that model.
Episode 3 is in Norwegian.
Read the English translation here.
Ep 3 in English
SOME TEXT HERE
Who does this well
TOP TIPS TO GET STARTED
Ramon´s top tips for massive site transformations
1) Use open formats to think long term: open BIM and IFC standards.
2) Be creative when integrating modern technology into existing facilities.
3) The owner must have a BIM strategy.
4) Balance the expectations with the existing national marked maturity.
5) Ask the market for help to find a common technological ground.
6) Make a project that is open to the world in all respects to share the knowledge.
Episode 4: 10 years of BIM Education in Norway
Harald Selvær and Harald Onarheim started together as two of the first students of the BIM Technician program at the Vocational College in Oslo in 2008. One Harald then walked across the room and became a teacher of BIM at the same school. The other went on to start his own business, making a career out of highlighting the possibilities for using BIM in the construction sector. 10 years on, it is time to sum up their experiences - and to look into the crystal ball to better understand what the future of BIM studies should be.
Episode 3 is in Norwegian.
Read the English translation here.
Ep 3 in English
Suggested reading

Are you looking to understand more about BIM education in Norway? Here is a collection of resources that make for a good starting point.

Bim as a Transformer of Processes
Paper from the BIM Technician program as presented by Harald Selvær and Ingolf Sundfør at the CAADence international workshop and conference in Budapest, June 2016.
BIM-suksess for Fagskolen
Article in Norwegian from the plumbing professional journal Rørfag, celebrating the success of the BIM Technician program and their new VR curriculum.
SOME TEXT HERE
Who does this well
TOP TIPS TO GET STARTED
Harald & Harald´s tips for BIM educators:
1) Make your students know how to build and know how that fits into the larger planning process, acquiring both theoretical and practical knowledge in a multi-disciplinary approach.
2) If you wonder about making BIM part of your existing education, you must realise that BIM is a game changer, you can’t really add it to a curriculum, you have to make a curriculum out of it.
3) BIM is part theory, part software, but is really very practical. Get your hands dirty, expect pain, troubles and difficulties before it works. Teach your students how to deal with that, it is a field that is very much expanding and changing.
4) There will be challenges: what is true today is outdated tomorrow. This goes for technology, how to use software, and the processes themselves. Knowing what to use at what time is key.
5) Make sure you make the students interact with the market, have them understand what happens in the industry. Ensure project based training, working in teams, solving actual challenges. Let the students impact the way you teach and explore the curriculum
Episode 5: Lifecycle BIM
What does life cycle BIM really mean? What do the various actors mean when using this term? Is there a mutual understanding to be found? What kind of societal potential lies in better and more effective ways of exploring the perspectives within lifecycle BIM? We will explore this topic by inviting three guests in the studio, each with their very own perspective: Linda Bystrøm as a major Norwegian owner of a large bulk of existing and future buildings from the Norwegian University of Life Sciences. Anett Andreassen is from Statsbygg, The Norwegian Directorate of Public Construction and Property. They construct and manage state owned buildings throughout Norway and abroad. Halvor Jensen from NTI, who contribute to the national digitization strategy by ensuring that good digital tools are available for all.
Episode 3 is in Norwegian.
Read the English translation here.
Ep 3 in English
SOME TEXT HERE
Who does this well
TOP TIPS TO GET STARTED
Top tips on thinking life cycle BIM
1) Focus on the building as an asset from the idea of a building through the decommissioning.
2) Think in circles. The information needs to be trackable throughout the entire process.
3) It is key to involve the user in the early digital construction.
4) Challenge the entrepreneurs and designers: what information do the end user really need? What information is needed in the decommissioning? The process becomes completely different when that is the starting point.
5) The circular economy will greatly impact the way we think in the construction industry. Start by making a model for the decommissioning, make it standard to reuse materials, find ways to digitalise the information in the existing buildings.
6) Define why, identify your problem, collect information from the building sensors and start exposing people to BIM. Just get started: Put in new demands, challenge your team, step ahead.
Episode 6: Seamless building sites through open BIM
Guest in Håvard Bell´s studio in this episode is Aleksander Bjaaland, CEO of Holte, a leading creator and distributor of software, services and training courses for the Construction Industry in Norway. The Holte mission is to simplify the Construction sector and make it more efficient. Catenda´s vision is to make the Construction industry data driven through open standards. Holte and Catenda just launched a collaboration that will greatly digitise the construction site, by simply empowering the user with great tools that just works. Making open BIM the foundation of the seamless building sites is something we both believe is key, but the end user should just get great tools. This episode talks about the value of digitising together, of the vast potential in joining forces, and of the buildingSMART summit in Tokyo.
Episode 3 is in Norwegian.
Read the English translation here.
Ep 3 in English
Suggested reading

Are you looking to understand more about Seamless building sites through open BIM? Here is a collection of resources that make for a good starting point.

SOME TEXT HERE
Who does this well
TOP TIPS TO GET STARTED
Top tips
1) We can’t be best at making everything. Find companies to collaborate with that become your best friends in making your own product line better.
2) Talk to all your competitors to create a joint standard set that is seamless for the users.
3) In order to be part of the solution, share your data and compete in the right way moving the industry forward as we go.
4) Innovation is key for the building industry, some of it takes time. Be in it for the long term, sometimes things take time to speed up in order for the market to respond.
Interested in exploring more?

Get in touch, we are happy to talk to you about your digitisation issues for your project.

BIM in local government - 
the enthusiast´s challenge
What is lifecycle BIM
buildingSMART Data Dictionary - a practical breakdown
Sustainability by BIM -  best practices